The Adventuring Party

Dwarven Cleric

Elven Wizard

Halfling Rogue

Human Fighter
Folk Hero

Human Fighter
Noble

Lost Mine of Phandelver is an adventure for four to five characters of 1st level. During the course of the adventure, the characters will advance to 5th level. The adventure is set a short distance from the city of Neverwinter in the Sword Coast region of the Forgotten Realms setting. The Sword Coast is part of the North—a vast realm of free settlements surrounded by wilderness and adventure. You don’t need to be a Forgotten Realms expert to enjoy this adventure; everything you need to know about the setting is contained in the book.

Roleplaying a Character

Each of the characters included in this set has two personality traits (one positive and one negative), an ideal, a bond, and a flaw. These elements can make the character easier and more fun to roleplay.

  • Personality traits provide a glimpse into the character’s likes, dislikes, accomplishments, fears, attitude, or mannerisms.
  • An ideal is something that the character believes in or strives for above all else.
  • A character’s bond represents a connection to a person, place, or event in the world— someone the character cares about, a place the holds a special connection, or a treasured possession.
  • A flaw is a characteristic that someone else can exploit to bring the character to ruin or cause the character to act against his or her best interests.

When a player roleplays a negative personality trait or gives in to a drawback presented by a bond or a flaw, that player’s character may (at the DM’s discretion) receive one inspiration as a reward. The player can then spend it when his or her character makes an ability check, an attack roll, or a saving throw. Spending inspiration gives the character advantage on the roll. A good use of inspiration is often to counteract disadvantage on a roll, especially in the heat of combat, or when trying to avoid it.


Dwarf Cleric

Kingdoms rich in ancient grandeur, halls carved into the roots of mountains, the echoing of picks and hammers in mines and blazing forges, a commitment to clan and tradition, and hatred of goblins and orcs—these common threads are the heritage of every dwarf.

Bold and hardy, dwarves are known as skilled warriors, miners, and workers of stone and metal. They can live to be more than 400 years old, so the oldest living dwarves often remember a very different world.

More on playing the dwarf & cleric

Dwarves are solid and enduring like the mountains they love, weathering the centuries with stoic endurance. Individual dwarves are determined and loyal, true to their word and committed in action, sometimes to the point of stubbornness.

In the Forgotten Realms, your people are called gold dwarves. They have remote kingdoms in the south and typically keep their distance from human a airs. Their brethren are the shield dwarves of the north, who are strong, hardy, and accustomed to a difficult life in rugged terrain. Years ago, you moved to that northern realm.

Clerics are intermediaries between the mortal world and the distant planes of the gods. As varied as the gods they serve, clerics strive to embody the handiwork of their deities. No ordinary priest or temple servant, a cleric is imbued with divine magic.

Divine Domain. You draw magic from a divine domain—a sphere of magical in uence—associated with your deity. Your domain lets you have certain spells, such as bless and cure wounds, always prepared.

Your domain is Life, which is a affiliated with many gods of good. Your god, Marthammor Duin, is the dwarf god of wanderers, travelers, and outcasts—those who move among strange lands and foreign peoples. Dwarves who honor him wear his holy symbol, a boot overlaid by an upright mace, on a necklace often made of silver and iron.

Trained as a soldier on the island of Mintarn, you traveled to Neverwinter as part of a mercenary company that serves as both army and city watch. You grew disillusioned with your fellow soldiers, who seem to enjoy their authority at the expense of the people they’re supposed to protect. Everything came to a head recently, when you disobeyed an order and followed your conscience. You were suspended from active duty, though you kept your rank and your connection to the mercenaries. Since then, you have devoted yourself to your deity.

Personal Goal: Teach the Redbrands a Lesson. You’ve heard that Daran Edermath in the town of Phandalin is looking for people of courage and principle to teach some bullies a lesson. These thugs, the Redbrands, have been throwing their weight around in Phandalin, much as your compatriots did in Neverwinter. Putting a stop to their villainy is a worthy goal.

Alignment: Neutral Good. Your conscience, not law and authority, will guide you to do the right thing. Power is meant to be used for the bene t of all, not to oppress the weak.

Elf Wizard

Elves are a people of otherworldly grace, living in the world but not entirely part of it. They live in places of ethereal beauty, in the midst of ancient forests or in silvery spires glittering with faerie light, where soft music drifts through the air and gentle fragrances waft on the breeze. Elves love nature and magic, art and artistry, music and poetry.

Elves can live over 700 years. They are more often amused than excited, and more likely to be curious than greedy. They tend to remain aloof and unfazed by petty happenstance, and they trust in diplomacy and compromise to resolve differences before they escalate to violence.

More on playing the elf & wizard

Most elves dwell in small forest villages hidden among the trees. Their contact with outsiders is usually limited, though a few elves make a good living by trading crafted items for metals, which they have no interest in mining.

In the Forgotten Realms, your people are named sun elves. Also called gold elves or sunrise elves, sun elves have bronze skin and hair of copper, black, or golden blond, and their eyes are golden, silver, or black. They are more reclusive than the other branch of high elves, the moon elves, but Oghma has called you to live among other peoples, rather than in the sanctuaries of your kin.

Wizards are supreme magic-users. Drawing on the subtle weave of magic that permeates the cosmos, they cast spells of explosive re, arcing lightning, subtle deception, and brute-force mind control. The mightiest wizards learn to conjure elementals from other planes of existence, glimpse the future, or turn slain foes into zombies.

You have spent your life dedicated to Oghma, all-seeing god of knowledge, and spent years learning the lore of the multiverse.

Personal Goal: Reconsecrate the Defiled Altar. Through visions delivered in your trances, your god has called you to a new mission. A goblin tribe has made its lair in an ancient ruin now called Cragmaw Castle, where they have de led a shrine once sacred to Oghma. Now dedicated to the vile goblin god Maglubiyet, the altar is an o ense to Oghma that must not stand.

You’re sure Oghma has greater things in store for you if you can complete this quest. In the meantime, your visions suggest that Sister Garaele—a priest of Tymora, the goddess of luck—can aid you in the town of Phandalin.

Alignment: Chaotic Good. The pursuit and acquisition of knowledge is for the bene t of all. Kingdoms and laws are useful so far as they allow knowledge to ourish. Tyrants who seek to suppress and control it are the worst villains. You share your knowledge freely, and use what you have learned to help where you can.

Halfling Rogue

The comforts of home are the goals of most halflings’ lives: a place to settle in peace and quiet, far from marauding monsters and clashing armies; a blazing re and a generous meal; and fine drink and fine conversation. Though some halflings live out their days in remote agricultural communities, others form nomadic bands that travel constantly, lured by the open road and the wide horizon to discover the wonders of new lands and peoples. But even these wanderers love peace, food, hearth, and home, though home might be a wagon jostling along an old dirt road.

The diminutive halflings survive in a world full of larger creatures by avoiding notice or, barring that, avoiding offense. Standing about 3 feet tall, they appear relatively harmless and so have managed to survive for centuries in the shadow of empires and on the edges of wars and political strife. They’re concerned with basic needs and simple pleasures and have little use for ostentation.

More on playing the halfling & rogue

Halflings are an amiable and cheerful people. They cherish the bonds of family and friendship, as well as the comforts of hearth and home, harboring few dreams of glory. Even adventurers among them usually venture into the world for reasons of community, friendship, wanderlust, or curiosity.

Rogues rely on skill, stealth, and their foes’ vulnerabilities to get the upper hand in any situation. They have a knack for nding the solution to just about any problem.

The town of Phandalin is built on the ruins of an older settlement, vacant for ve centuries until some hardy settlers set about rebuilding it some years back. Drawn by stories of gold and platinum in the nearby foothills, you came to Phandalin as well, not to earn a living, but to prey on those who struck it rich. You joined a gang calling itself the Redbrands and made some decent coin as a burglar, enforcer, or fence.

But you must have made an enemy among your fellow Redbrands. Someone set you up. On that person’s word, the head of the Redbrands—a wizard called Glasstaff—tried to have you killed. You escaped, barely alive and thanking Tymora, the goddess of good fortune, for your luck. You ed Phandalin, almost penniless and with only the tools of your trade to your name.

Personal Goal: Get Your Revenge. Someone in the Redbrands nearly got you killed, and you sure would like to know who it was. And then you’d like to take your revenge—on that person, on Glasstaff, maybe on all the Redbrands. And you just got a tip that might help you: someone named Halia Thornton also has it out for the Redbrands. She lives in Phandalin, which means showing your face to the Redbrands who still want you dead.

Alignment: Neutral. You tend to do whatever seems best at the time. Sure, you’ve done some things you’re not proud of, and you’re not personally committed to making the world a better place. But you have no interest in causing suffering or making things worse than they already are.

Human Fighter - Folk Hero

Humans are the youngest of the common races, late to arrive on the world scene and short-lived in comparison to dwarves, elves, and dragons. But they are the innovators, the achievers, and the pioneers of the world, the most adaptable and ambitious people among the common races.

When humans settle somewhere, they stay. They build cities to last for the ages and great kingdoms that can persist for centuries. They live fully in the present—making them well suited to the adventuring life—but also plan for the future, striving to leave a lasting legacy.

More on playing the human fighter & folk hero

Human culture varies by region. In the Forgotten Realms, the clothing, architecture, cuisine, music, and literature in the northwestern lands of Neverwinter are different from their counterparts in distant Turmish or Impiltur to the east. Human physical characteristics vary according to the ancient migrations of the earliest humans, so that the humans of Neverwinter have every possible variation of coloration and features.

Fighters are the most diverse class of characters in the worlds of Dungeons & Dragons. Questing knights, conquering overlords, royal champions, elite foot soldiers, hardened mercenaries, and bandit kings—as fighters, they all share an unparalleled mastery with weapons and armor, and a thorough knowledge of the skills of combat. And they are well acquainted with death, both meting it out and staring it defiantly in the face.

Your parents lived in the prosperous village of Thundertree, east of the city of Neverwinter and at the edge of the Neverwinter Wood. But when nearby Mount Hotenow erupted thirty years ago, your parents ed, carrying you in your infancy. Your family drifted from village to village around the region, nding work as servants or laborers where they could.

You’ve spent the last few years in Neverwinter as a porter and laborer at the city’s bustling docks. But it’s clear to you and everyone around you that you are destined for much more. You stood up to an abusive ship captain once, so other dockworkers look up to you. Someday, you’ll come into your own. You’ll be a hero.

Personal Goal: Drive Off the Dragon. The ruins of Thundertree call to you. Your family and their friends once lived in prosperity there, and now they’re reduced to menial labor. The ruins are haunted by ash zombies, and rumor has it a dragon has made its lair in the Old Tower, but those are problems a hero can solve. Slay the dragon, or drive it off, and you’ll prove—to yourself and everyone else—you’re a real hero, destined for greatness.

Alignment: Lawful Good. A hero stands up to evil and never lets bullies have their way. A hero fights for law and order, so that everyone can live in prosperity and happiness. A hero slays monsters, clears ruins, and protects the innocent. You strive to be such a hero.

Human Fighter - Noble

Humans are the youngest of the common races, late to arrive on the world scene and short-lived in comparison to dwarves, elves, and dragons. But they are the innovators, the achievers, and the pioneers of the world, the most adaptable and ambitious people among the common races.

When humans settle somewhere, they stay. They build cities to last for the ages and great kingdoms that can persist for centuries. They live fully in the present—making them well suited to the adventuring life—but also plan for the future, striving to leave a lasting legacy.

More on playing the human fighter & noble

Human culture varies by region. In the Forgotten Realms, the clothing, architecture, cuisine, music, and literature in the northwestern lands of Neverwinter are different from their counterparts in distant Turmish or Impiltur to the east. Human physical characteristics vary according to the ancient migrations of the earliest humans, so that the humans of Neverwinter have every possible variation of coloration and features.

Fighters are the most diverse class of characters in the worlds of Dungeons & Dragons. Questing knights, conquering overlords, royal champions, elite foot soldiers, hardened mercenaries, and bandit kings—as fighters, they all share an unparalleled mastery with weapons and armor, and a thorough knowledge of the skills of combat. And they are well acquainted with death, both meting it out and staring it defiantly in the face.

Your family is no stranger to wealth, power, and privilege. In the glory days of Neverwinter, your parents were the count and countess of Corlinn Hill, a large estate located in the hills northeast of the city. But Mount Hotenow erupted thirty years ago, devastating Neverwinter and erasing Corlinn Hill from the map. Instead of growing up on an estate, you were raised in a small but comfortable town house in Waterdeep. As an adult, you stand to inherit a meaningless title and little else.

Personal Goal: Civilize Phandalin. You were meant for more than being a ruler of nothing at all. Rebuilding Corlinn Hill is impractical, thanks to the volcano. But in the last three or four years, hardy settlers have been rebuilding another ruin near the city: the old town of Phandalin, which orcs sacked five centuries ago. Clearly, what Phandalin needs now is a civilizing influence—someone to take the reins and bring law and order. Someone like you.

You’re not the only one with such ideas. A knight named Sildar Hallwinter recently set out for Phandalin in the company of a dwarf named Gundren Rockseeker. They plan to reclaim an ancient mine and restore Phandalin to a civilized center of wealth and prosperity. Since your goals align, Hallwinter should be willing to assist you.

Alignment: Lawful Neutral. It’s essential to establish law and order, even if it takes an iron st to do it. The nobility are bound by honor and tradition to protect their people from both external and internal threats to stability. An organized society leaves no room for evil and chaos to take root.